Original Research

Investigating cyberloafing, organisational justice, work engagement and organisational trust of South African retail and manufacturing employees

Adele Oosthuizen, Gerhard H. Rabie, Leon T. De Beer
SA Journal of Human Resource Management | Vol 16 | a1001 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajhrm.v16i0.1001 | © 2018 Adele Oosthuizen, Gerhard H. Rabie, Leon De Beer | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 16 October 2017 | Published: 03 May 2018

About the author(s)

Adele Oosthuizen, School of Industrial Psychology and Human Resource Management, North-West University, South Africa
Gerhard H. Rabie, School of Industrial Psychology and Human Resource Management, North-West University, South Africa
Leon T. De Beer, WorkWell Research Unit, North-West University, South Africa


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Abstract

Orientation: Understanding cyberloafing, organisational justice, work engagement and organisational trust will lead organisations to develop strategies to counter the consequences of cyberloafing.

Research purpose: This research explored the relationships between cyberloafing, organisational justice, work engagement and organisational trust among South African office workers in the retail and manufacturing industry.

Motivation for the study: Cyberloafing, a prevalent way for office employees to engage in non-work-related activities during work time, is considered harmful to organisations. Limited research exists about the relationship between cyberloafing and organisational justice, organisational trust and work engagement within South Africa.

Research design, approach and method: A quantitative research design was followed. Questionnaires were administered in the South African retail and manufacturing industry; a convenient sample of N = 224 was obtained. Descriptive statistics, Cronbach’s alpha coefficients, structural equation modelling and bootstrapping were used for data analysis.

Main findings: Organisational justice was positively related to organisational trust while organisational trust was positively related to work engagement; work engagement related negatively to cyberloafing. Organisational trust mediated the relationship between organisational justice and work engagement while work engagement mediated the relationship between organisational trust and cyberloafing.

Practical and managerial implications: Strategies can be developed to enhance and warrant perceptions of organisational justice and fairness that will increase trust levels, leading to higher work engagement and decreased cyberloafing behaviour and resulting in higher productivity.

Contribution or value-add: The research revealed that when employees perceive their organisations as being fair, organisational trust will increase, leading to heightened work engagement levels and ultimately reducing cyberloafing behaviour.

Keywords

cyberloafing; organisational trust; work engagement; organisational justice; counterproductive work behaviour

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