Original Research

Job characteristics, work-nonwork interference and the role of recovery strategies amongst employees in a tertiary institution

Jani Oosthuizen, Karina Mostert, Frieda E. Koekemoer
SA Journal of Human Resource Management | Vol 9, No 1 | a356 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajhrm.v9i1.356 | © 2011 Jani Oosthuizen, Karina Mostert, Frieda E. Koekemoer | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 31 January 2011 | Published: 10 November 2011

About the author(s)

Jani Oosthuizen, School of Human Resource Sciences, WorkWell: Research Unit for Economic and Management Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, South Africa
Karina Mostert, School of Human Resource Sciences, WorkWell: Research Unit for Economic and Management Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, South Africa
Frieda E. Koekemoer, School of Human Resource Sciences, WorkWell: Research Unit for Economic and Management Sciences, North-West University, Potchefstroom Campus, South Africa


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Abstract

Orientation: Although work characteristics and recovery strategies are associated with work- family interference, the influence on specific types of work-nonwork interference (W-NWI) has not been investigated.

Research purpose: The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of work characteristics and recovery strategies on four types of W-NWI.

Motivation for the study: It is clear from the literature that job characteristics and W-NWI have adverse effects on employees’ health and well-being. It is therefore important to identify work characteristics and recovery strategies associated with W-NWI.

Research design, approach and method: A cross-sectional survey design was used in this study. The target population was married employees with children working at a Tertiary Education Institution (TEI) in the North West Province (N = 366).

Main findings: Work pressure and emotional demands significantly predicted all the work-nonwork role interference dimensions. A lack of autonomy predicted work-parent interference and work-religion and/or spirituality interference, whilst a lack of development possibilities predicted work-religion and/or spirituality interference. Relaxation and mastery recovery experiences significantly predicted lower work-parent interference. A lack of psychological detachment and relaxation were significantly associated with lower work- spouse interference. Relaxation and control significantly predicted lower work-domestic interference, whilst psychological detachment significantly predicted lower work-religion and/or spirituality interference.

Practical/managerial implications: The results give managers insight into the specific work characteristics and recovery experiences that play a role in W-NWI, upon which interventions can be based to address these issues.

Contribution/value-add: This study provides information on the relationship between work characteristics, recovery experiences and the effect on different types of W-NWI.


Keywords

job demands; job characteristics; work-nonwork interference; recovery experiences; tertiary education institution

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