Original Research

Performance management, vigour, and training and development as predictors of job satisfaction in low-income workers

Molefe J. Maleka, Leigh-Anne Paul-Dachapalli, Suzette C. Ragadu, Cecilia M. Schultz, Lize van Hoek
SA Journal of Human Resource Management | Vol 18 | a1257 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajhrm.v18i0.1257 | © 2020 Molefe J. Maleka, Leigh-Anne Paul-Dachapalli, Suzette C. Ragadu, Cecilia M. Schultz, Lize van Hoek | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 23 July 2019 | Published: 18 May 2020

About the author(s)

Molefe J. Maleka, Department of People Management and Development, Faculty of Management Sciences, Tshwane University of Technology, eMalahleni Campus, eMalahleni, Pretoria, South Africa
Leigh-Anne Paul-Dachapalli, Department of People Management and Development, Faculty of Management Sciences, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria Campus, Pretoria, South Africa
Suzette C. Ragadu, Department of People Management and Development, Faculty of Management Sciences, Tshwane University of Technology, eMalahleni Campus, eMalahleni, Pretoria, South Africa
Cecilia M. Schultz, Department of People Management and Development, Faculty of Management Sciences, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria Campus, Pretoria, South Africa
Lize van Hoek, Department of People Management and Development, Faculty of Management Sciences, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria Campus, Pretoria, South Africa

Abstract

Orientation: New insights into how managers can develop strategies to enhance job satisfaction, how researchers can use a different approach when collecting data by conducting a survey at a mall instead of an organisation, and an understanding of the relationship between performance management, vigour, and training and development of low-income workers form part of the orientation of this article.

Research purpose: The authors endeavoured to determine whether performance management, vigour, and training and development positively predicted the job satisfaction of low-income workers in the South African context.

Motivation for the study: Little, if any, research exists about the relationships between performance management, vigour, and training and development as well as the job satisfaction of low-income workers in the South African context.

Research approach/design and method: The research approach was quantitative, descriptive and causal in nature. This study mostly comprised the units of analysis, namely low-income workers who were under-researched in the South African context. Hence, 877 respondents were purposefully selected for this study.

Main findings: The results showed that performance management was the highest predictor of job satisfaction. The second highest predictor of job satisfaction was vigour, and the third highest predictor of job satisfaction was training and development.

Practical/managerial implications: This research will empower managers to develop strategies to enhance employees’ job satisfaction by paying attention to performance management, vigour, and training and development.

Contribution/value-add: This study was conducted on an under-researched sample, at a mall and suggested vigour as an intrinsic variable to be included in the Herzberg job satisfaction model.


Keywords

performance management; vigour; training and development; job satisfaction; low-income workers

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Crossref Citations

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