Original Research

The development and validation of the Rewards Desirability Inventory

Janine A. Victor, Crystal Hoole
SA Journal of Human Resource Management | Vol 19 | a1599 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajhrm.v19i0.1599 | © 2021 Janine A. Victor, Crystal Hoole | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 04 March 2021 | Published: 14 September 2021

About the author(s)

Janine A. Victor, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, Faculty of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Crystal Hoole, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, Faculty of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa


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Abstract

Orientation: Research on reward preferences remains inconclusive. Total reward theories often do not take the role of intrinsic psychological rewards into consideration. Further to this, there are not only limited instruments available to measure reward preferences but also ease of access to psychometrically sound measures is further challenging.

Research purpose: The aim of this study was to develop and validate an instrument to measure reward preferences in the working environment.

Motivation for the study: Organisations require tools to enhance waning motivational levels in the workplace. The measurement of reward preferences appears essential to determine what employees ultimately want from their work to improve levels of motivation. Major limitations exist regarding current reward preference instruments.

Research approach/design and method: Quantitative scale development procedures were employed to construct the 32-item instrument. Data were collected from South African employees (N = 639) and processed using both Factor and Rasch analysis procedures.

Main findings: The factor analysis revealed a 3-factor structure (Non-financial rewards, Financial rewards and Benefits and growth opportunities). Items evidenced good factor loadings and dimensions demonstrated high internal consistency. The dimensions and overall scale performed mostly well in accordance with Rasch Model expectations. Based on the overall results, one can confirm that the new instrument has satisfactory psychometric properties.

Practical/managerial implications: The instrument can help employers and scholars to measure, understand and explore what employees value and seek from the working environment.

Contribution/value-addition: The study expands on limited pre-existing theory and empirical research pertaining to the measurement of rewards preferences. A unique and psychometrically sound reward preference instrument is provided for use by scholars and employers.


Keywords

Reward preferences; factor analysis; Rasch Model; scale development; reliability; validation; South Africa; Rewards Desirability Inventory

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