Original Research

The role of emotional intelligence and work engagement on nurses’ resilience in public hospitals

Pardon Chikobvu, Martha Harunavamwe
SA Journal of Human Resource Management | Vol 20 | a1690 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajhrm.v20i0.1690 | © 2022 Pardon Chikobvu, Martha Harunavamwe | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 02 June 2021 | Published: 28 February 2022

About the author(s)

Pardon Chikobvu, Department of Industrial Psychology, Faculty of Economic Management Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa
Martha Harunavamwe, Department of Industrial Psychology, Faculty of Economic Management Sciences, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, South Africa


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Abstract

Orientation: The ability to cope effectively with adversity has become vital for healthcare employees because of high job demands. Nurses are faced with workplace adversities that drain resilience resources; as such it is important to investigate factors that may conserve and build resilience resources. Positive states in the form of emotional intelligence and engagement have the potential to activate and conserve resources for coping and adaption amongst nurses.

Research purpose: The study was designed to investigate empirically the predictive value of emotional intelligence and work engagement on nurses’ resilience.

Motivation for the study: The study was motivated by the fact that negative experiences or adversities kindle loss of resources for coping and adaptive functioning. Promoting positive states has the potential to motivate the building of resources that improve coping and adaptation.

Research approach, design and method: The study utilised a cross-sectional quantitative survey using self-administered questionnaires. The sample comprised 252 nurses from the Mangaung Metropole, South Africa. The SmartPLS programme was used to analyse the data.

Main findings: Emotional intelligence and work engagement had a statistically significant effect on resilience. Of great significance was the strong direct link between emotional intelligence and resilience.

Practical or managerial implication: The healthcare sector needs to invest training in emotional intelligence and work engagement programmes for nurses as a way to improve their resilience; a coping strategy for the highly demanding and stressful work environments.

Contribution: These findings contribute valuable new knowledge that can be applied in promoting and enhancing resilience of nurses in public hospitals.


Keywords

resilience; work engagement; emotional intelligence; nurse in the public hospitals; personal resources; work overload

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