Original Research

The perceived impact of a global pandemic on a provincial department’s organisational structure

Kiara N. Nyanhongo, Lesego V. Mokhutsane, Mahlapane T. Mosebi, Thato M. Thobejane, Thabang S. Mathudi, Musawenkosi D. Saurombe
SA Journal of Human Resource Management | Vol 21 | a2254 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajhrm.v21i0.2254 | © 2023 Kiara N. Nyanhongo, Lesego V. Mokhutsane, Mahlapane T. Mosebi, Thato M. Thobejane, Thabang S. Mathudi, Musawenkosi D. Saurombe | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 15 February 2023 | Published: 27 September 2023

About the author(s)

Kiara N. Nyanhongo, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Lesego V. Mokhutsane, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Mahlapane T. Mosebi, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Thato M. Thobejane, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Thabang S. Mathudi, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa
Musawenkosi D. Saurombe, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, College of Business and Economics, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg, South Africa

Abstract

Orientation: Several existing studies examine the effect organisational structures have on businesses, but there is limited research that considers the effects unforeseen crises have on organisational structures.

Research purpose: The study sought to determine the effects that the coronavirus disease 2019 (COVID-19) pandemic and lockdown had on the organisational structure of a provincial health department, specifically relating to performance management, employee productivity and organisational citizenship behaviour.

Motivation for the study: Additional pressure on health workers, who were seen as ‘essential workers’ during the pandemic, motivated the investigation of how organisational structure affects employees’ ability to perform their duties during crises.

Research approach/design and method: The study employed a quantitative research approach, using surveys. A non-experimental research method and convenience sampling were employed and a sample of 207 respondents (n = 207) was achieved.

Main findings: The respondents agreed that the pandemic did not cause a decline in their performance due to effective workload management. They also agreed that they still felt passionate about their work during the pandemic. They further posited that the pandemic emphasised the importance of teamwork.

Practical/managerial implications: The study offers insights into some factors that produced successful outcomes when handling the pandemic, which can inform organisational strategy during any similar future crises.

Contribution/value-add: The study adds to the limited literature linking human resources management and change or crisis management, which is critical when navigating a rapidly changing present and an increasingly uncertain workplace future.


Keywords

organisational structure; performance management; employee productivity; organisational citizenship behaviour; COVID-19 pandemic.

JEL Codes

L20: General

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 8: Decent work and economic growth

Metrics

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Total article views: 1068


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