Original Research

Leadership power bases influence on quality of work-life and intention to stay among retailing employees

Mbali E. Maphanga, Aubrey B. Mokoena, Anthony K. Isabirye
SA Journal of Human Resource Management | Vol 22 | a2403 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajhrm.v22i0.2403 | © 2024 Mbali E. Maphanga, Aubrey B. Mokoena, Anthony K. Isabirye | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 26 July 2023 | Published: 07 June 2024

About the author(s)

Mbali E. Maphanga, Department of Human Resource Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, Vaal University of Technology, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa
Aubrey B. Mokoena, Department of Human Resource Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, Vaal University of Technology, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa
Anthony K. Isabirye, Department of Human Resource Management, Faculty of Management Sciences, Vaal University of Technology, Vanderbijlpark, South Africa

Abstract

Orientation: Retail managers utilise their position of authority to obtain the highest calibre work to uphold the perceived standards of their individual businesses.

Research purpose: The goal of this research is to investigate the impact of leadership power bases and workplace quality on employees’ intentions to remain at a particular retail location in the Gauteng province.

Motivation for the study: Effective and efficient management of staff is a key factor in determining the success of retailers in businesses of all sizes in that employees can be significantly impacted by the leadership power a store manager possesses.

Research approach/design and method: A quantitative cross-sectional research design utilising a probability random sampling technique was adopted to collect data from a sample of 336 employees through a structured questionnaire.

Main findings: Reward power showed a negative prediction of quality of work–life, whereas coercive power and lawful power bases showed a favourable contribution to the prediction of quality of work–life. In addition, quality of work–life proved to be a significant predictor of intention to stay.

Practical/managerial implication: By investing in leadership development and fostering a supportive work culture, organisations can create an environment that encourages employees to stay for the long term.

Contribution/value-add: Understanding the influence of different power bases, organisations can target development opportunities that will improve overall leadership capability and create a more positive work environment.


Keywords

quality of work–life; intentions to stay; retailing; leadership power bases; reward power; coercive power; legitimate power.

JEL Codes

M10: General

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 8: Decent work and economic growth

Metrics

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