Original Research

Developing creative and innovative thinking and problem-solving skills in a financial services organisation

Cherylene De Jager, Anton Muller, Gert Roodt
SA Journal of Human Resource Management | Vol 11, No 1 | a502 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajhrm.v11i1.502 | © 2013 Cherylene De Jager, Anton Muller, Gert Roodt | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 09 October 2012 | Published: 08 May 2013

About the author(s)

Cherylene De Jager, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, University of Johannesburg, South Africa
Anton Muller, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, University of Johannesburg, South Africa
Gert Roodt, Department of Industrial Psychology and People Management, University of Johannesburg, South Africa


Share this article

Bookmark and Share

Abstract

Orientation: An important evaluation function is to determine whether creative and innovative thinking and problem-solving skills can be developed through training and to assess whether these skills, on their own, are sufficient to ignite innovation in organisations.

Research purpose: The evaluation question that the present study aimed to address is whether employees in a corporate context, such as a financial services organisation, can develop creative and innovative thinking and problem-solving skills through an intervention such as a workshop.

Motivation for the study: A financial services organisation commissioned the primary author of this article to design a workshop with the intent to develop the creative and innovative thinking and problem-solving skills of their employees in order to ignite innovation and competitiveness.

Research design, approach and method: This study employed mainly qualitative research. Utilisation-focused evaluation (UFE) was employed and findings from the literature review, questionnaires, pen-and-paper tests and interviews were used. The unit of analysis was a niche business unit in a South African financial services organisation.

Main findings: From this study’s point of view, the most critical finding related to the confirmation that individuals can acquire creative and innovative thinking and problemsolving skills. The acquisition of these skills, however, is not sufficient on its own to establish a culture supportive of creativity and sustainable innovation.

Practical/managerial implications: The development of creative and innovative thinking and problem-solving skills of employees is not sufficient on its own to support sustainable innovation. Managers should consciously establish determinants on an organisational as well as an individual level to create an environment supportive of sustainable innovation.

Contribution/value-add: The present study indicated how a workshop can assist individuals to develop creative and innovative thinking and problem-solving skills. The acquisition of these skills is not sufficient on its own to ignite sustainable innovation.

Keywords

creativity; creative thinking skills; innovation; ignite; initiate; problem-solving skills

Metrics

Total abstract views: 5678
Total article views: 12787

 

Crossref Citations

1. Organisational learning capabilities as determinants of social innovation: An empirical study in South Africa
Boris Urban, Elena Gaffurini
SA Journal of Human Resource Management  vol: 15  year: 2017  
doi: 10.4102/sajhrm.v15i0.857