Original Research

Job embeddedness, work engagement and turnover intention of staff in a higher education institution: An exploratory study

Ndayiziveyi Takawira, Melinde Coetzee, Dries Schreuder
SA Journal of Human Resource Management | Vol 12, No 1 | a524 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajhrm.v12i1.524 | © 2014 Ndayiziveyi Takawira, Melinde Coetzee, Dries Schreuder | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 30 January 2013 | Published: 06 May 2014

About the author(s)

Ndayiziveyi Takawira, Department of Human Resource Management, University of South Africa, South Africa
Melinde Coetzee, Department of Industrial and Organisational Psychology, University of South Africa, South Africa
Dries Schreuder, Department of Industrial and Organisational Psychology, University of South Africa

Abstract

Orientation: The world economy is becoming increasingly knowledge driven, and intellectual capital is now considered as a human resource that affords organisations a competitive advantage. A high turnover rate in higher education and the importance of retaining staff are concerns that have resulted in increased interest in psychological variables, such as job embeddedness and work engagement that may influence employee retention.

Research purpose: The objective of this study was to explore the relationship between job embeddedness, work engagement and turnover intention of staff in a higher education institution.

Motivation for the study: Research on how employees’ job embeddedness and work engagement influence their turnover intention is important in the light of organisational concerns about retaining knowledgeable staff in the current higher education environment.

Research design, approach and method: A cross-sectional quantitative survey was conducted on a non-probability purposive sample (N = 153) of academic and non-academic staff in a South African higher education institution.

Main findings: Correlational analyses revealed significant relationships between job embeddedness, work engagement and turnover intention. Multiple regression analyses showed that organisational links and dedication significantly and negatively predict turnover intention.

Practical/managerial implications: When designing retention strategies, management and human resource practitioners need to recognise how job embeddedness and work engagement influence the turnover intention of higher education staff.

Contribution: These findings contribute valuable new knowledge that can be applied in the retention of staff in the higher education environment.

Keywords

job embeddedness; work engagement; turnover intention; fit; links; vigour; dedication

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