Original Research

Psychological capital, job demands and organisational commitment of employees in a call centre in Durban, South Africa

Kreshona Pillay, Johanna H. Buitendach, Herbert Kanengoni
SA Journal of Human Resource Management | Vol 12, No 1 | a599 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajhrm.v12i1.599 | © 2014 Kreshona Pillay, Johanna H. Buitendach, Herbert Kanengoni | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 09 October 2013 | Published: 11 December 2014

About the author(s)

Kreshona Pillay, Department of Psychology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Johanna H. Buitendach, Department of Psychology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa
Herbert Kanengoni, Department of Psychology, University of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa; Department of Industrial Psychology, University of the Free State, South Africa


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Abstract

Orientation: The South African call centre industry is growing as call centres are increasingly used as a means of service delivery to customers. Positive psychologists posit that psychological capital could lead to positive outcomes such as organisational commitment of call centre staff.

Research purpose: This study investigated the relationship between psychological capital, job demands and organisational commitment and intended to determine whether psychological capital and job demands predict call centre employees’ organisational commitment.

Motivation for the study: The study aimed to explore potential links between psychological capital, job demands and organisational commitment of call centre employees. It is premised on previous research that call centre job demands may be related to commitment to the organisation.

Research approach, design and method: This cross-sectional study sampled 117 call centre employees from Durban, South Africa, and used a biographical questionnaire, psychological capital questionnaire, the job-demands-resources scale and the organisational commitment questionnaire to collect data.

Main findings: Findings indicated a statistically significant relationship between psychological capital and work overload, as well as a practically and statistically significant relationship (medium effect) between psychological capital and continuance organisational commitment. The results showed that psychological capital has predictive value for continuance organisational commitment.

Practical/managerial implications: Psychological capital has predictive value for continuance organisational commitment. Organisations can develop initiatives to enhance positive psychological states and address this relationship.

Contribution: The findings could be beneficial to management and employees in considering ways to boost psychological capital in order to improve organisational commitment.


Keywords

job demands; continuance organisational commitment; positive psychology; psychological capital; call centre employees

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Crossref Citations

1. Psychological Capital: Convergent and discriminant validity of a reconfigured measure
Anton Grobler, Yvonne T. Joubert
South African Journal of Economic and Management Sciences  vol: 21  issue: 1  year: 2018  
doi: 10.4102/sajems.v21i1.1715