Original Research

Exploring the causal relationship between the antecedents and consequences of talent management for early career academics in South African higher education institutions

Dorcas L. Lesenyeho, Nicolene E. Barkhuizen, Nico E. Schutte
SA Journal of Human Resource Management | Vol 16 | a912 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajhrm.v16i0.912 | © 2018 Dorcas L. Lesenyeho, Nicolene E. Barkhuizen, Nico E. Schutte | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 12 February 2017 | Published: 12 July 2018

About the author(s)

Dorcas L. Lesenyeho, Global Innovative Forefront Talent, Research Niche Area, North-West University, South Africa
Nicolene E. Barkhuizen, Global Innovative Forefront Talent, Research Niche Area, North-West University, South Africa
Nico E. Schutte, Global Innovative Forefront Talent, Research Niche Area, North-West University, South Africa


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Abstract

Orientation: South African public higher education institutions (HEIs) are facing significant challenges to attract and retain quality early career academics. Therefore, the need exists to explore the potential antecedents and consequences of effective talent management practices for early career academics.

Research purpose: The objective of this study was to explore the causal relationship between the antecedents (i.e. talent attraction; management support) and consequences (organisational commitment; intention to quit) for early career academics employed in selected South African public HEIs.

Motivation for the study: Research using a holistic approach for the effective talent management of early career academics is lacking.

Research approach/design and method: Quantitative data were gathered by administering a Talent Attraction Tool, a Talent Development Measure, a Talent Retention Diagnostic Tool and the Organisational Commitment Measure, using a sample of early career academics in public South African HEIs (N = 117).

Main findings: The results showed that management support, talent development, compensation and recognition, and satisfaction with institutional practices significantly enhances the organisational commitment of early career academics and reduces their turnover intentions.

Practical/managerial implications: The results highlight the importance of management support in enhancing the effective application of talent management practices among early career academics. Higher education managers are encouraged to implement talent development opportunities and adequate compensation and recognition practices to retain early career academics.

Contribution/value-add: The research provides useful information on how talent management practices can be effectively applied to enhance the commitment and retention of early career academics.

Keywords

early career academics; higher education institutions; organisational commitment; talent attraction; talent retention

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Crossref Citations

1. Talent management in higher education: is turnover relevant?
Rob Gandy, Patricia Harrison, Jeff Gold
European Journal of Training and Development  vol: 42  issue: 9  first page: 597  year: 2018  
doi: 10.1108/EJTD-11-2017-0099