Original Research

The impressions of industrial psychologists of their proficiency as coaches

Inge-Amé De Bruin, Lené I. Graupner
SA Journal of Human Resource Management | Vol 22 | a2302 | DOI: https://doi.org/10.4102/sajhrm.v22i0.2302 | © 2024 Lene Ilyna Graupner, Inge-Amé de Bruin | This work is licensed under CC Attribution 4.0
Submitted: 06 April 2023 | Published: 23 January 2024

About the author(s)

Inge-Amé De Bruin, School of Industrial Psychology and Human Resource Management, Faculty of Economic and Management Science, WorkWell Research Unit, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa
Lené I. Graupner, School of Industrial Psychology and Human Resource Management, Faculty of Economic and Management Science, WorkWell Research Unit, North-West University, Potchefstroom, South Africa

Abstract

Orientation: Coaching’s expansion is driven by its impact on job performance and wellbeing through positive reinforcement and goal achievement. Working as coaches for individuals, teams, and organisations, industrial psychologists often report feeling inadequately prepared for their coaching roles.

Research purpose: The objective of this study was to explore industrial psychologists functioning as coaches, and, their training and development needs related to coaching in the workplace.

Motivation for the study: Coaching is driven by its benefits for job performance and wellbeing, highlighting a challenge where many industrial psychologists, frequently acting as coaches, feel unprepared.

Research approach, design and method: A qualitative research approach with an interpretivism paradigm was employed in this study. The participants, industrial psychologists and interns (N = 17) were approached using snowball sampling. The data was captured with qualitative surveys and analysed using thematic analysis.

Main findings: The results showed that some participants felt confident since they experienced certainty of coaching psychology theories and the role of self-awareness in shaping their coaching methods. Some participants experienced less confidence in their coaching abilities and highlighted the need for supervision from a mentor in sound coaching practices. The participants reported a need for further development in skills such as emotional competence, and theoretical and technological knowledge and practice management.

Practical/managerial implications: Coaching interventions by industrial psychologists can enhance employee strengths, boosting organisational returns and promoting a triple-bottom-line.

Contribution/value-add: An industrial psychologist committed to coaching development can significantly boost both personal and organisational growth.


Keywords

Coaching Psychology, Industrial and Psychology, coaching, skills development, coaching skills

JEL Codes

I31: General Welfare, Well-Being; J24: Human Capital • Skills • Occupational Choice • Labor Productivity; O15: Human Resources • Human Development • Income Distribution • Migration

Sustainable Development Goal

Goal 3: Good health and well-being

Metrics

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